Entries in Healing Spaces (16)

Sunday
Dec082013

AUTOHYPNOSIS: the shortcut to a deep meditative state of mind

The Dolder Grand

Health Care &
Rejuvenation

 

PD Dr. Rainer Arendt
Internal Medicine & Cardiology FMH
Prevention & Regenerative Medicine

Timeea-Laura Burci
Lifestyle Coach & Jin Shin Jyutsu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trance or hypnosis denote a variety of processes, techniques, modalities and enhanced states of mind, awareness and consciousness.

Trance or hypnosis may be induced through specific induction techniques, meditation, ritual, sensory stimuli, healing touch, or prayer.

Trance or hypnosis include all the different states of mind, emotions, moods and daydreams that human beings experience. Trance states may be accessed or induced for the purposes of enhanced performance, intuition or inspiration, and healing.

Trance may be perceived as endemic to the human condition and a Human Universal. Principles of trance are being explored and documented as are methods of trance induction. Benefits of trance states are being explored by medical and scientific inquiry. Many traditions and rituals employ trance. Trance also has a function in religion and mystical experience or visions.

Milton Erickson, the founder of hypnotherapy, introduced trance and hypnosis to academic medicine and psychotherapy.

In our therapeutic sessions, we access the trance state by double-induction with two therapists (male and female) employing auto-hypnosis, EMDR, kinaesthetic stimulation and exposure to overwhelming beauty.

 

 

Healing (literally meaning to make whole) is the process of the restoration of health to an unbalanced, diseased or damaged organism. Healing may be physical or psychological, with respect to physical damage or disease suffered by an organism, healing involves the repair of living tissue, organs and the biological system as a whole and resumption of normal functioning. It is the process by which the cells in the body regenerate and repair to reduce the size of a damaged or necrotic area and replace it with new living tissue. The replacement can happen in two ways: by regeneration in which the necrotic cells are replaced by new cells that form similar tissue as was originally there; or by repair in which injured tissue is replaced with scar tissue. Most organs will heal using a mixture of both mechanisms.

In psychiatry and psychology, healing is the process by which neuroses, psychoses or crises are resolved or overcome to the degree that the client is able to lead a normal or fulfilling existence without being overwhelmed by psychopathological phenomena. This process may involve psychotherapy, pharmaceutical treatment and increasingly re-discovered traditional spiritual approaches or energy medicine (from trance or hypnosis to transcranial magnetic deep-brain stimulation).

 

Come and experience deep-trance as an infinite well-spring of vitality, healing and replenishment.

 

The Agate Windows at the Grossmünster Zürich, by Sigmar Polke.
Polke succeeds in transforming the Grossmünster into an event of luminous colour, resulting in the seeming paradox of walls that are solid but radiantly translucent. Geologic time resonates in the images of nature within the agate stones themselves. Their intense colouring makes them look so contemporary, at times recalling movements of Modern Art.

 

Thursday
Jul282011

The Colorists - Swiss Landscape Graphics from 1766-1848

The Dolder Grand

Health Care &
Rejuvenation

 

PD Dr. Rainer Arendt
Internal Medicine & Cardiology FMH
Prevention & Regenerative Medicine 

Timeea-Laura Burci
Lifestyle Coach & Jin Shin Jyutsu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Tobias Pfeifer-Helke with the Foundation Graphica Helvetica (editor), catalogue in collaboration with Francisca Lang and Gun-Dagmar Helke: Die Koloristen, Schweizer Landschaftsgraphik von 1766 bis 1848. Berlin/München 2011 (Deutscher Kunstverlag).

 

After the Seven Years’ War (a global military conflict between 1756 and 1763, involving most of the great powers of the time and affecting Europe, North America, Central America, the West African coast, India, and the Philippines) Switzerland - along with Italy – began to be perceived by the contemporaries as the most beautiful landscapes in Europe. For this, the Swiss printed graphic art was of enormous importance. Prints were an agent for and multiplier of the growing enthusiasm for Switzerland and the enchantment with her landscapes. The Swiss colored prints were also an important link between the older Dutch tradition of watercolor painting and novel techniques after 1800. Travelers such as Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, or the Russian Tsar Paul I appreciated the immediate grasp of nature in the prints and admired the coloring technique, a novelty in the European graphics market.

 

Heinrich Rieter (born in Winterthur, 1751-1818). View of Spiez on Lake Thun. Pencil and watercolor on handmade paper, before 1790. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)

 

Gabriel Ludwig Lory (born in Berne, 1763-1840). Island of Schwanau in Lake Lauerzer. Colored contours etching, 1795. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)


Gabriel Ludwig Lory (born in Berne, 1763-1840). Lauterbrunnen valley with Jungfrau. Pencil and pen in black with watercolor. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)

 

Gabriel Matthias Lory (borne in Berne, 1784-1846). Santa Maria degli Angioli in Lugano. Pen in black and watercolor. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011) 

 

Gabriel Matthias Lory (borne in Berne, 1784-1846). Matterhorn. Pencil and watercolor. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)

 

Peter Birmann (borne in Basel, 1758-1844). Fiumelatte on Lake Como. Pen in black and brush in brown, 1807. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)


Samuel Birmann (borne in Basel, 1793-1847). Aiguille Verte with Glacier des Bois and the village of Les Praz. Pencil, pen, watercolor and bodycolor, 1823. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)

 


Samuel Birmann (borne in Basel, 1793-1847). Lake Thun with Stockhorn and Niesen. Pencil and watercolor. (Tobias Pfeifer-Helke. Die Koloristen. 2011)

 

 

We like to invite you to the sites of unfading natural beauty in Switzerland, and to catch up with all what happened here since 1848, some of that will last too, at least for a while....  

 

Harald Naegeli (born in Zurich, 1939). Graffiti study. Spray on paper, 1993. (Gallery Kunst im West)

Monday
Jul252011

Faces from Switzerland

The Dolder Grand

Health Care &
Rejuvenation

 

PD Dr. Rainer Arendt
Internal Medicine & Cardiology FMH
Prevention & Regenerative Medicine 

Timeea-Laura Burci
Lifestyle Coach & Jin Shin Jyutsu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Melchior Imboden, Innerschweizer Gesichter. Berne 2011 (Benteli). 

 

Get real people looking at you.... 

Albertina, a countrywoman from Stansstad (Melchior Imboden).  

 

Karl, a forestry worker from Erstfeld (Melchior Imboden). 

 

Bernhard, an Älpler from Alp Eggenrüti (Melchior Imboden). 

 

 

Fritz, a shunter from Lucerne (Melchior Imboden). 

 

 Angela Rosengart, a gallery owner from Lucerne (Melchior Imboden).

 

Peter von Matt, a literature professor from Zurich (Melchior Imboden). 

 

Young girl at the International Costumes Festival in Buochs (Melchior Imboden).  

 

Flüela Hotel, Davos. Winter brochure 1920. 

 

 

Benno at the cattle market in Stans-Oberdorf (Melchior Imboden).

 

 

Pirmin at the cattle market in Stans-Oberdorf (Melchior Imboden). 

 

 

Rhybadi in Schaffhausen (Bruno and Eric Bührer, 1961). 

 

 

 Carlos, a handball player from Hergiswil (Melchior Imboden).

 

Chantal, a student from Lucerne (Melchior Imboden). 

 

Sibel, a student from Lucerne (Melchior Imboden). 

 

Elisabeth EIDENBENZ, founder of the Swiss maternity home "Mothers of Elne", Southern France, for refugees from fascism in Spain and Germany, 1937-45.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_Eidenbenz

http://www.maternitesuissedelne.com/eng/elisabeth.html

Monday
Jul042011

Breathing fresh air in Switzerland

The Dolder Grand

Health Care &
Rejuvenation

 

PD Dr. Rainer Arendt
Internal Medicine & Cardiology FMH
Prevention & Regenerative Medicine 

Timeea-Laura Burci
Lifestyle Coach & Jin Shin Jyutsu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Images, words, reflections of a searcher

a Swiss landscape view after the rain

"I have been in Founex in the suburbs of Geneva for the last 2 days. I came to Switzerland to attend an exhibition of my photos in Lausanne.

As this area has been home to my sister for some years, I have been here on many visits and each single time, the strongest impression I bring back with me is the quality of the air!

I have been living in Shanghai, China for over 4 years now. If you have been to Shanghai then you know that the air is thick with all kinds of pollutants and factory emissions that make living with lung conditions a normal state of affairs.

And then you come to a place like the Swiss country side, vineyards, green pastures, lakes, majestic mountains, fast-moving clouds, refreshing rain showers, clean beauty surrounding you everywhere you look. And then you breathe in!!

Each breath I take makes me feel like I am taking in a meal of the healthiest kind. I walk, I breathe in, walk, breathe in…

And with each gaze to the horizon, you experience colors, peace, tranquility…healing.

Every life must include some doses of this, a break from what is ailing our planet and ruining its atmosphere.

Take a breath of fresh Swiss air.."

after the rain, the Swiss countryside glimmers

 

 
Saturday
Jan292011

The traditional art of graffiti in the Engadine

Aesthetic + Health Link
Medical Wellness Practice

The Dolder Grand

 

PD Dr. Rainer Arendt

Internal Medicine & Cardiology FMH
Prevention & Regenerative Medicine


Timeea-Laura Burci

Lifestyle Coach & Jin Shin Jyutsu

 

 

Romansh: rumantsch/rumauntsch/romontsch; German: Rätoromanisch; Italian:Romancio is one of the four national languages of Switzerland, along with GermanItalian and French. It is one of the Rhaeto-Romance languages, believed to have descended from the Vulgar Latin variety spoken by Roman era occupiers of the region, and, as such, is closely related to FrenchOccitan and Lombard, as well as other Romance languages to a lesser extent.

As of the 2000 Swiss Census, it is spoken by 35,095 residents of the canton of Graubünden (Grisons) as the language of "best command", and 61,815 in the "best command" plus "most spoken" categories. Spoken now by around 0.9% of Switzerland's 7.7 million inhabitants, it is Switzerland's least-used national language in terms of number of speakers.

Romansh is an umbrella term covering a group of closely related dialects, spoken in southern Switzerland and all belonging to the Rhaeto-Romance language family. The other members of this language family are spoken in northern ItalyLadin, to which Romansh is more closely related, is spoken by some 22,550 in the Dolomite mountains of Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol, and Friulian is spoken by between 550,000 and 595,000 people in northeastern Italy.

Romansh is spoken in the Swiss canton of Grisons or Graubünden, "the Grey League", which preserves the name of the self-defence organisation of Romance speakers set up in the 15th century. It became part of Switzerland in 1803. Germans once called this language Chur-Wälsch, "foreign speech of Chur" (the English word "Welsh" had the same origin), for Chur was once the centre of Romansh. This is cited as one possible explanation of the origin of the modern term "Kauderwelsch" meaning gibberish. However, most of Grisons, including Chur and even its cross-river suburb of Welschdörfli ("little foreign-language-speaking village"), now speak German; Romansh survives only in the upper valleys of the Rhine and the Inn. Romansh speakers nowadays almost always are multilingual, being able to speak standard German and Italian as well as the local Graubünden dialect of Swiss German.

Lovely literature has been published in Romansh since the mid-16th century. The Engadine dialect was first printed as early as 1552 in Jacob Bifrun's Christiauna fuorma, a catechism; a translation of the New Testament followed in 1560.

Here are the first verse of three verse poem by Peider Lansel (1863–1943), translated by M.E. Maxfield:

MASSA BOD! (TOO SOON!)
O sblacha fluoretta, (O, pale little flow'ret,)
tu vainsch massa bod! (Too soon thou art here!)
amo be suletta (Alone in the wildwood)
at dervasch nil god. (And full of vague fear.)

For further details see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romansh_language

 

Wall inscriptions in form of the Sgraffito have been popular in the Engadine since the 15th century, most of the traditional Engadine houses have them.

The typical Engadine house style with the massive stone front and small funnel-shaped windows that allowed a maximum of light to enter the interior with a minimum loss of heat.

The word graffiti originates from the Italian and means scratched. Graffiti designs are not painted but scratched into a lime plaster.

For your orientation a map of the Engadine, with the most important locations. Traveling there is curative for all kinds of sorrows and Seelenschmerz....

 

Texts and following images are examples from the beautiful book by Erna Romeril, Engadiner Lebensweisheiten. Crailsheim 2011 (Baier BPB Verlag). These rare photographic volumes I usually find at my favorite Zurich bookseller, Buchhandlung am Hottingerplatz, Cornelia Schweizer, Hottingerstrasse 35.

You will find this inscription in Samedan. L'umaun sainz'amur es scu ün pro sainza flur. A human being without love is like a meadow without flowers.

 

 

From Samedan. Quista chesa nun es tia, tü crajast cha la saja mia, neir quel chi zieva me gnaro co stabla dmura nu varo. The house you see before you is neither your house nor is it mine. Nor will it belong to those who come after us for no one finds a permanent home on this earth.

 

 

From Madulain. Dür cun dür nu fo bun mür. A good wall must be made of hard stone and soft mortar.

 

 

 

From Zuoz. Traunter her e damaun tia vit' hest in maun. Between yesterday and tomorrow is the time you have your life in your own hands.

 

 

From Zuoz. Sine arte sine amore non est vita. Life is not worth living without art and without love.